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The Berry Patch
Contact: Alea Oien
Address: 4512 Trafalgar Ave Juneau, AK, 99801
Email Address: aleaoien@gmail.com
Phone: 907-209-8730
About Us
The Berry Patch, based at the foot of Thunder Mountain, is a small grower and seller of cut flowers, vegetables, nursery plants and chickens for eggs. I am always experimenting with plants and trees that will grow and over winter in our zone 3 (glacial) environment. This summer the Berry Patch will be experimenting with growing roses for cut flowers. In mid to late summer the dahlia patch bursts with color. There are over 100 varieties of dahlia flowers representing a multitude of colors, forms and sizes which are sold as bouquets or by the stem. I also grow giant pumpkins - my largest weighing in at 119 pounds.

The name "The Berry Patch" comes from my love of berry picking. I spend many summer days hiking for miles to get to the best wild berry patches. There is nothing better than picking berries with good friends. We pick berries in the blazing sun and in the pouring rain - where our fingers get so cold we put them in "picking position" and leave them there until we are done picking. Any extra jams and jellies I produce I offer for sale. All jams and jellies are made using the lower sugar pectin.

About wild berries - According to:

Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 5;72. doi:
10.3402/ijch.v72i0.21188. eCollection 2013.
Dinstel RR1, Cascio J, Koukel S.

The Alaska wild berries collected and tested ranged from 3 to 5 times higher in a value than cultivated berries from the lower 48 states.
Cultivated (commercial) blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. This is also higher than lower 48 wild blueberries, which had a score of 61.
All of the Alaskan berries tested had a level of antioxidant considered nutritionally valuable, ranging from 19 for watermelon berries to 206 for lingonberries on the ORAC scale.
With the processed products made from 4 Alaska wild berries, one of the unexpected outcomes of the research was that the berries continued to have levels of antioxidants considered high, despite the effects of commonly used heat-processing techniques. When berries were dehydrated, per gram ORAC values increased.
Practices
We eat the food we grow, so we grow, organically, the food we eat. Our egg laying ladies provide compost for the garden. We also use brewery grain, and maple leaves to build up our soil.

Our eggs come from happy hens who are fed high quality laying foods, alfalfa, healthy kitchen scraps, brewing grains and in the fall and winter they always have pumpkins and wild berry pulp to peck at.